Reciting poetry

Some poems cry out to be read aloud while others are just for private consumption. Our poetry anthology has both and I had the pleasure of reading out a couple last night at the Willows folk club in Arundel. This time I read one by our friend Bryan as that was more likely to make people laugh and it did. I get a real kick out of making people laugh. I can see why comedians enjoy their job.

I bought a copy of Pam Ayres’ verses from a charity stall last month and found a new favourite. Although I like “I wish I’d looked after me teeth,” there’s one entitled “Heaps of Stuff” which is so true I feel I want to find somewhere to recite it, just to get a reaction! Mind you, I can’t do that lovely accent so it might not be so successful.

The book is “The Works” selected poems, and the quality varies so I won’t do a review.She said herself her verses were written to be spoken out loud and she sounds great performing them.

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Conference

As a reader for the talking newspaper in Littlehampton  I attended a South of England Talking News Conference at St Richard’s hospital in Chichester with  about 14 other groups, some from as far afield as Norfolk.

The programme was well balanced with speakers from The British Wireless Fund for the Blind, the Talking News Federation, 4Sight and Chichester Area Talking news.

The march of mobile technology and its use in communicating with blind and partially sighted people to allow them to feel part of the community was at the core of all our discussions. The future is digital.

I just hope we don’t lose our faithful listeners on the way.

‘New’ website

What a great response to my poem. Thanks, folks. Also, now I have updated my website, http://www.juliecround.co.uk I have more people looking at it. I do need to email some of my readers to tell them about it but , most of all, I hope it will bring in more invitations to speak as I don’t have any for 2018 and I know most groups organise their speakers a year in advance.

The poetry book is under discussion but until I am sure of the layout I can’t ask Joan for more cartoons. I wish I had kept a list of everyone who bought “Honey and Humbug” but I didn’t. That’s a lesson, folks, keep a list of all your readers. It seems cheeky but it helps when you write the next book!

Hubby has made a database so I can track all the stories I send out for competitions. That will be my next task, when this hot weather breaks. At present I don’t feel like doing anything!

Talk

Have just returned from a talk that eight of the Sea Scribes gave to members of Worthing’s Phoenix Club at their speaker’s lunch. The food was delicious and we were treated to a glass of wine each.

Then we took turns in talking about how to write and publish books. Elaine Hankin had ordered it so that we each had a subject, non-fiction, plotting and character, proof reading etc. and then three of us told how we self published. I go-it-alone, Elaine uses Feedaread and Angela uses Createspace.

We took books as examples and hoped for sales but, although we did get some interested folk asking questions, it was not intended as a selling event and so it transpired.

When I came home I found my play was not going to be used in a local festival and the competition I entered closed yesterday, although I only found out about it today. They asked for a sonnet and if  they don’t want it I’ll post it on here next week.

All good fun!

Book sales

Self publishers often find that selling copies of paperback books is much more difficult than selling e-books.In fact, some of them opt to publish on line but not bother to use print at all.

There are plenty of people ready to give advice about selling on line but not so many suggesting how to get books in shops or in libraries.

If you don’t mind adding to the five copies you sent to other libraries your local library will probably accept free copies, but if you can find a group of people who are interested in your kind of story you may be able to make some sales.

If your book is set in a particular location or a special period of history then you should be able to find people who want to read it, even if they do not know you as an author.

If you have a certain age group as a target (my first book was written for pensioners, especially my own mother) or people who enjoy a certain activity, like swimming or ballet or hiking, seek them out in places they frequent.

I have had a wonderful time talking to members of the WI as they are very appreciative of my family based novels. Public speaking is not too difficult if you are enthusiastic about your subject and you have a friendly audience.

Now to find a passage to read tonight!

Speaking success

This morning I gave another talk to a group of pensioners. They seemed very pleased that I was a local author and asked perceptive questions when I finished. These talks are always a joy and this one was especially good as I sold nine books. It is still a fact that people want to read about the local area, even if it is fiction and they pass the stories around a group rather than looking on line for the ebook –  but just to find people happy to take copies is a bonus. I was even pleased when a library in another part of the country accepted a donated copy of ” A Lesson for the Teacher”and actually thanked me for it!

The pantomime is almost ready for me to show it to someone who might want to use it. I’m pretty nervous about the reaction I might get but I had fun writing it, anyway.                   ( I also had fun reading it out loud and doing all the different voices but that’s another story)