Right click

Just to explain why I was so happy to be able to put clipart on line. I haven’t used the right mouse button for twenty years and am only now beginning to discover its uses.

I am so impressed by the photos on this site but don’t use a camera that takes pictures. Now you see what an old fogey I am.I am trying to get up to date but its a hard slog.

I got so fed up with having nothing to write about but I have the glimmering of an idea. It is for children and will need a great illustrator. Luckily I know one who would be ideal.

Time will tell.

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Tags

I was talking to someone who found me on Google and wondered why all my readers on wordpress come from countries other than the UK. Maybe it’s because I don’t use the right tags? I’m still learning how to put things on line. I tried to find a picture of a mouse to go with the last post but once I had it I couldn’t see how to get it onto this blog.( It’s on twitter #jacyround)

That poem was in Sea Scribes’ Christmas anthology and, as I am not writing a novel at present I thought I might put some more verses on from our Worthing  anthology until I realised how long they were.There’s only one that won’t take up too many lines:

The day of the big parade and the Council’s plans were laid

They closed the roads and the signs all showed where the procession stayed.

But they stood there in the rain as it poured from sky to drain

And, in the wet, the dancers fret “We dressed up all in vain.”

While the rain came sheeting down, floats trundled through the town

And the puddles grew as the people knew it was causing the day to drown.

But the Samba band played on as they marched to a cheery song

And the lorries drove while the brollies hove into view, along the prom.

We have had our summer fun, when it’s Birdman day they come,

In the fair they play, but this August day we really missed the sun!

( Worthing took over from Bognor to hold the Birdman event while their pier was out of order)

 

 

 

The Christmas Mouse poem

There once was a white mouse called Poppit whose owners were going away

They called us and said could they drop it, for Christmas, two nights and one day.

I said that we’d have him with pleasure and find him a home in the shed

Such a cute little pet I would treasure with his cage and his wheel and his bed.

We moved all the pots for the flowers and cleared all the tools from the shelves

Then left, to be ready for Santa, his reindeer, his presents, his elves.

Next morning I ran down the garden to see if dear Poppit was fine.

I’d left all my parcels unopened for, of course, I had plenty of time.

I looked at the cage in the corner but couldn’t see Poppit inside

Perhaps he had gone somewhere warmer under his bedding, to hide?

But, alas, he had fled, we had lost him. There was just not one sign of a mouse

He’s escaped, you might think we had crossed him. We should have kept him in the house.

So the day that was Christmas we started to empty our old garden shed.

The contents on wheelbarrow carted, just hoping the mouse wasn’t dead.

And when, with the day nearly over and the junk on display on the grass-

When we’d given up hope for the rover – He was out in the open at last!

That holiday won’t be forgotten. The mouse was returned to his home

And a day that could have been rotten – inspiration for this Christmas poem.

 

 

 

Old stories

What do you do with your old stories? I don’t mean ones you have read; I mean ones you wrote years ago and kept copies. I write so much I have bags and boxes full of stories, most of which have been rejected by various magazines. I have a file of poems, many of them only relevant at the time they were written but, somewhere, I have an unfinished novel and short stories galore.

I have magazines I dare not throw away as they have a story or an article I have had published and very little space to add to the collection. Luckily, all copies of the poetry book we wrote as a group have been sold or given away but I am drowning in paper, with no filing system, just shelves and cupboards.

Do you keep the manuscripts of your books after they have been printed? If  I could destroy them I would have more space.It’s no fun being a hoarder.

#SelfPublishing Writers Need All the Help They Can Get — Notes from An Alien

I’ve periodically shared various writing tools and different writing software… I’ve never quite known what to say about these writing aids, mostly because writers are so different in their needs and habits… One thing I think I do know, since I am a self-published author, is that we Indie-types really do need a lot of […]

via #SelfPublishing Writers Need All the Help They Can Get — Notes from An Alien

Keep trying

I have just sent off an article to Mature Times as the magazine I first offered it to have not replied.If I get it published I’ll be content but wouldn’t it be nice if they asked for more?

I’ll be up in the loft this weekend for more copies of “A Lesson for the Teacher” to take on holiday.As it contains scenes in Chatham,Greenford,Ealing, Shoreham,Brighton, Burnham  and Torquay I can’t expect Worthing people to buy it to find places they recognise as I could with the other five books. It has to rely on folk who remember the 1960’s. Luckily, we may be with a few of those!

The last copy of “Honey and Humbug” will be sold this weekend. (I have archived one)We enjoyed producing our own poetry anthology but we didn’t ISBN it and the 100 we had printed were often given away as presents so it was expensive.

I am trying to think of another story for a competition. Writing Magazine have a whole year of competitions in their last issue. Talks are great but I need to be creating!