Book Review. A Portrait of Rosanna.

I have always enjoyed books by Elaine Hankin but this one gripped me more than most. It was fascinating to read how Rosanna interacted with the men in her life and how the whereabouts of the portrait was a constant mystery throughout. The descriptions of Italy were fascinating and the characterisations excellent. A thoroughly good read.

I did begin to wonder whether folk gave up on purchasing paperbacks when the book they required was on kindle. Knowing that my first book, Lane’s End is no longer available as a new book and was never an e book I checked on amazon to see if it was there. Happily there are second hand copies for sale, which is how I buy my paperbacks.

Since my kindle stopped working I have gone back to getting most books out of the library unless, like A Portrait of Rosanna, I want to keep them to read again.bookwormclipart

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Review: “The Second Coming.”

Maybe I’m a bit daring , writing a review of this book on an international blog but John Niven’s book both shocked and enthralled me.

This was political satire disguised as humour and I’m glad I picked up the red cover version as I thought the one with the face tasteless, but then the whole book is designed to upset and provoke.

A swearing and disappointed God sends his musical son back down to earth to try to tell people to stop fighting and be nice to one another. In order to become noticed Jesus (JC) enters a talent contest. Does he change the world? What do you think?

Set in the USA and taking pot shots at Christianity throughout this is a story designed to make one think. Unforgettable.

Local promotion

I have had an interesting week as, after the book launch, a local magazine printed an article about me which I have reproduced on my pages. Then the local newspaper decided to print my thank you letter to the Pavilion Cafe/bar together with a photo I sent them just on the off chance they might use it one day and it took up a quarter of a page!

I had my first comment from someone who enjoyed ‘A Bend in the Lane’ and said they had read it straight through. It’s easy to do that with my novels as they are only about 200 pages long.

The UK Southern Book Show is on again in October so we have another event to look forward to, as well as the Broadwater Carnival on Saturday. I’ll be there all day and hope to make some more sales which result in reviews as Goodreads list books by popularity and I need to get the new book on the first page of my dashboard.

So far I am resisting a free giveaway but if someone who has read my previous books asks for a copy I’ll send one in return for a review, even if they are abroad.9781999633400

Vanishing blog

Now what have I done wrong? Although someone must have seen my last blog my reader list says it was updated five days ago so I can’t see what everyone else sees. I have tried to re-follow myself to see if that works.

I posted the books to the Deposit Library and have sent a couple off for reviews. Now to try to update Goodreads and Amazon.

I had fun designing the invitation but I won’t put it on here as my laptop seems to stop working every time I post a photo.

I’ve had five orders already. That’s the ticket!

Book Titles

Each time I finish a book I write a review for Goodreads but one has to find the correct title first and I so often find a number of copies by different authors with the same titles.

Surely it is the job of the author, publisher or agent to make sure this isn’t the case? Maybe it is clever to use a similar title to a book by a popular author but I have just found four copies of books with the title ‘Hot Milk.’ Why?

When I began self publishing I did not check to see if another author had used the title of my first book but, since then, I have tried to be original.

Maybe , from now on, I’ll search for books by author, not title!

Review. The Twelve.

A crime thriller by Stuart Neville that does not spare the violence but seems so authentic one can only be glad that one wasn’t caught up in it. I found the idea of ghosts urging an assassin to wreak revenge an interesting plot device and, for once, felt that the language was realistic rather than written to shock.

I  may not search out more books by this author but I found this one hard to put down.